Time to Talk with Books

Time to Talk with Books

Why is sharing books with your child beneficial?

Even babies love books!

How Using Books Can Help Your Child With Their Speech and Language Therapy and Learning DevelopmentLooking at books with your children, even from a young age, provides opportunities for developing  early communication skills,such as:

Joint attention

Attention and Listening

Vocabulary development

Use of sentences

Conversational skills

Print awareness

Children need to hear many words and often. Books expose children to unfamiliar words that they might not come across in their everyday environment (eg. elephant, castle, skiing, enormous), Books often repeat the same words over and over in the story, this helps develop  vocabulary and understanding of a wider range of words.

What is a ‘good book’?

A ‘good book’ is really any book that your child enjoys! This will depend on the age, and interests of your child.

For babies, a suitable suitable book might have:

Large Colourful, realistic  pictures free of distractions: to capture their attention

Not too many ‘busy’ details: To keep their attention and so your child can match what you are talking about with the picture

Every day words and actions that your baby is familiar with:

Easy to turn pages

Sturdy Books: Use books  made of materials that your child can play and read over and over without tearing or ruining them. Board books (with strong cardboard pages), fabric, or plastic books are all excellent choices for babies and toddlers.

For toddlers, a suitable book might have:

bright, colorful pictures: Before children learn to read, they “read” pictures. Find books with a variety of illustrations and see which ones have the greatest appeal to your toddler

A realistic/familiar story line that they can relate to: This will help your child’s understanding of the story

Simple Text: Fewer words on each page will help your child stay focused as the pages change more frequently, eg. one sentence per page will help hold attention!

Colorful pictures: Simple illustrations will help your child stay focused better than complex or busy pictures.

Repetitive text: Books that have the same phrase over and over will have your toddler joining in the story as you read.

Familiar and interesting  Words: Choose stories with familiar and interesting objects such as farm/zoo animals and stories that contain the everyday routines , activities and experiences (eg going to the park/shops)  that are recognisable to your child.

Interactive parts: books that have lift-a-flaps or textured materials for your toddler to feel help make the book more interesting. Be careful though as some children can get distracted by moving bits and actually attend less to the story.

Sturdy Books: Use books  made of materials that your child can play and read over and over without tearing or ruining them. Board books (with strong cardboard pages), fabric, or plastic books are all excellent choices for babies and toddlers.

 For Pre-schoolers a suitable book might have:

Interesting pictures: that relate closely to the text

A sequence of actions: so you can talk about what is happening in the story with your child

More detailed plot: This might extend their knowledge or introduce an event that is outside of their experience

Surprise: something usual might happen which gives opportunities to talk about why or how something happened

A problem that needs to be solved: This can lead to discussion of how the problem was solved  and why it worked (or not) and you can talk aobut other possible solutions.

Rhyme and rhythm:  Encourage your child to listen to sounds in words and to predict words by using rhyming patterns eg one two three four, I saw teddy knocking on the ….(door)

Comments are closed.